68% rise in sexual assaults reported in Dublin.

When I first started this blog back in late 2014, I did so due to concerns that I had about the future of my country. I looked at the stories that were coming in from all across Europe. Stories about terrorist attacks. Stories about an increase in sexual assaults and rapes. Stories about an increasing number of homicides. And worst of all, stories about an apathetic and indifferent populace that was not only refusing to resist what was happening to their countries, but was in fact actively supporting the policies that were leading to these problems in the first place.

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“At first I was like…”
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“But then I was like…”

At the time, Ireland was relatively sheltered from what was happening. Being an Island on the periphery of Europe, and being relatively backward in comparison to our European neighbours, we were quite far behind the other countries on the path to national suicide. At the time when I started the blog, I was still somewhat optimistic that we could avoid the same fate that so many other countries were experiencing. However, following the Dundalk incident in January, the Kildare incident, that I wrote about in my last post, and today’s story, I have come to the conclusion that no, we cannot avoid the same fate as other European countries.

We’re already in the process of experiencing it.

From Dublin Live

Concerns have been raised over a 68% rise in the number of reported sexual assaults in Dublin South Central over the last 12 months.

An increase of that level, in that short of a time is not normal at all. This is absolutely dreadful.

Earlier this week, a meeting of the Local Policing Forum heard that the number of sexual assaults in the area rose to 19 for the first six months of the year, compared with 13 over the same period in 2017.

19 might not seem like all that much, and in comparison to certain other countries *cough* “Sweden” *cough*, it certainly isn’t, but that’s not the point. Even one, is too many as far as I’m concerned.

And one representative from the area has called for tougher laws to tackle those convicted of the crime.

That would definitely be an improvement, yes.

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With headlines like these, it doesn’t exactly paint a great picture of Ireland’s justice system.

Fianna Fail Senator Catherine Ardagh believes that while a greater awareness of sexual crimes may be leading more people to come forward, any increase in the figure was “deeply worrying.”

Yes it is deeply worrying. And no, I don’t buy into that “greater awareness” excuse at all. They used the same excuse to explain Germany and Sweden, and we all know what crap that was.

She said: “Those living in the South Inner City and the surrounding communities should feel safe walking home and going about their daily lives without the fear of any assault.

Yes they should. But that’s just not going to happen, if the present course of action continues. We’ve seen what has happened in Sweden. We’ve seen what has happened In Germany. In France. In Britain. In many other European countries. And we’re making the exact same mistakes that they have. There’s no way we can do what they’re doing, and expect to keep our people safe. The two things are mutually exclusive.

“As policy makers we need to be vigilant and ensure that all that can be done to detect and prevent such attacks is being done.

Might I suggest closing the borders to the kind of people who would do this…?

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Or this…?

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Or this…?

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Of course not, because for some reason, the safety and wellbeing of our own people, is less important than not offending people we have no moral or ethical obligation to.

“Increasing sentences is one element of the public response that needs to be further examined.”

Finding ways to prevent it from happening in the first place, would be an even better thing to look at. But that won’t ever happen because of the conflict of interest there.

Senator Ardagh also said that her party has proposed an update and expanding of legislation to effectively deal with sexual offences, including stronger criminal penalties.

She added: “I intend on raising this matter in the Seanad and to seek clarity on the measures in place to deter criminals from carrying out sexual assault.”

Soft sentences are only a small part of the problem, and harsh sentences are not enough of a deterrent. If they were, nobody would be committing capital crimes in countries that have the death penalty. Yet they continue to do so anyway. A harsh sentence is only useful after the crime has been committed, as a way of making the victim feel as if justice has been done, and that their victimiser is being made to suffer for what they did to them. But harsh sentences don’t deal with the actual problem, which is the existence of the kind of people who are evil enough to do the things that they do, and their presence in our societies.

Yes, individuals from any demographic can be involved in these kinds of crimes. And yes, whatever their demographic background, they’re all equally despicable. But there’s a big difference between members of the native demographic committing a crime and non-natives doing it. The natives are our responsibility to deal with. We can’t deport them, and we can’t block them from living among us. We can only deal with them after the fact. But the non-natives can’t claim the same luxury. The excuse of “natives also commit sexual assaults and rapes” as a justification for importing more rapists, is an idiotic talking point.

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“Dogs sometimes maul people. So lets import a load of tigers and let them roam our streets  freely because animal attacks already happen anyway.” This is what it sounds like to me when people use the “native people also rape” line.

And on top of that, when these non-native demographics are vastly overrepresented in these types of crimes, it only highlights the absurdity of the situation even further.

But whatever. I’ve been worrying about this scenario for the last few years, and now it is finally here. There’s nothing I can do about it. All I can do, is watch how it plays out, wait for people to wake up to the new reality and ask any Dublin women who are reading this, to take care of yourself, and try to be safe.

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